Skip to main content

The Crimson Field: Episodes 5 & 6

This is the conclusion of the reviews for the mini-series The Crimson Field.  By the conclusion of these two episodes, most everyone's secrets will be revealed to the audience if not to other characters.

Episode 5

This is the episode in which secrets are revealed for better or worse (for some it is definitely for worse).  Major Ballard is a rather unpleasant man with a secret that jeopardizes both his life and the men he serves with on the front lines.   Luckily the matron easily ferrets it out and turns him in to Lt. Col. Brett to confirm it.  Meanwhile Ballard rather enjoys taunting the matron in order to tease out her secret that was alluded to in the last episode by Sister Quayle.  Sister Quayle is mercifully absent throughout the episode having been suddenly and unwillingly dispatched back to England for a breather a.k.a. some soul searching to determine whether she can continue to serve under Matron Carter.  (If Sister Quayle cannot serve under matron without undermining her authority, matron says Quayle will be transferred; I vote for a transfer to the casualty hospital where Major Yellin is now serving, preferably before the bomb I ordered drops on it.)

In the wake of Kitty's ending of her romance with Gillan before it even began, Gillan has decided that Kitty is too much drama and gives her the cold shoulder throughout the episode.  Kitty guesses Nurse Livesey's secret and confronts her about it only to warn her to be careful.  And then Livesey's attempts to receive news of her loved one results in the worst possible person discovering it.  I don't know how this ends, but it won't end well.

Episode 6

It turns out that Livesey's secret is a German fiance who now serves (reluctantly?) for the German military.  His escape, aided and abetted by Livesey, means (really) bad things for Livesey, Lt. Col. Brett, Matron Carter, and the whole hospital encampment.  As Livesey's trial commences, Brett receives devastating news regarding his son serving on the front lines.  Meanwhile, Livesey's trial pits friends on opposite sides of controversy.  Also the colonel or whoever he is running the trial is callous, insensitive, and clueless.

Sister Quayle, called back to the encampment early by her new BFF the supply quartermaster who also incidentally discovered Livesey's secret and turned her in,  returns in time to possibly destroy Lt. Col. Brett's career with her hidden piece of evidence.  And yet despite her perfect opportunity to do so, Quayle instead inexplicably decides to hand over the piece of evidence to Matron Carter for destruction, accept the matron's terms and conditions of continuing work in the encampment, and puts the screws to the quartermaster for a cut of his black market sales.

My thoughts

Major Ballard can join Yellin (and Quayle) at the casualty hospital please.

The quartermaster and Sister Quayle deserve each other; also I'm sure the man will rue the day (if he doesn't already) of trying to forge an alliance with Quayle.

Sister Quayle has an inflated sense of her own intelligence and importance; and she's blind to the fact that this is one of the many reasons that she was passed over for promotion.


--Reviewed by Ms. Angie

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Broken by Karin Slaughter

Before I begin the formal review there are a few things I need to get off my chest in the wake of finishing this book; I'll do so without giving away too many (or any) spoilers.
The OUTRAGE!: the identity of Detective Lena Adams' new beau; the low depths to which Grant County's interim chief has sunk and brought the police force down with him; agent Will Trent's wife, Angie's, sixth sense/nasty habit of reappearing in his life just when he's slipping away from her. Thank God for small miracles though because while Angie was certainly referred to during the book, the broad didn't make an appearance. One sign that I've become way too invested in these characters is that I'd like to employ John Connolly's odd pair of assassins, Louis and Angel, to contract out a hit on Angie; do you think Karin Slaughter and John Connolly could work out a special cross over?
Hallelujah: Dr. Sara Linton and agent Will Trent are both back. There is no hallelujah for…

Crow Lake by Mary Lawson

When the end came, it seemed to do so completely out of the blue, and it wasn't until long afterward that I was able to see that there was a chain of events leading up to it. Some of those events had nothing to do with us, the Morrisons, but were solely the concern of the Pyes, who lived on a farm about a mile away and were our nearest neighbors." from page seven
I must confess that it took me longer than it really needed to in order to finish the novel Crow Lake by Mary Lawson. The entire story is building up to the big catastrophe that forever destroys all the hopes and dreams the Morrison clan ever dared to hope and dream for its future. In the eyes of the narrator, it is even worse than the tragedy of the car crash that claimed both parents' lives one evening on the heels of some good news the family has received and celebrated. Now you can see why I dreaded getting to the end of a book that drips in foreboding like nobody's business. What can be a worse tra…

In The Woods by Tana French

"What I warn you to remember is that I am a detective. Our relationship with the truth is fundamental, but cracked, refracting confusingly like fragmented glass. It is the core of our careers, the endgame of every move we make, and we pursue it with strategies painstakingly constructed of lies ... and every variation on deception. The truth is the most desirable woman in the world and we are the most jealous lovers, reflexively denying anyone else the slightest glimpse of her. We betray her routinely ... This is my job ... What I am telling you, before you begin my story, is this--two things: I crave truth. And I lie." opening lines of In The Woods chapter 1, pages 3-4
In The Woods by Tana French, an Irish writer, is an extremely well-written and well-crafted mystery novel. The downside is that this is French's debut novel, and her website (located at http://www.tanafrench.com/) does not offer any insi…